The emphasis in this course is on developing effective teaching practices in the Mathematics and Statistics Learning Area of the New Zealand Curriculum. Students will investigate the primary school Numeracy Programme and inquire into assessment as an integral aspect of fostering improvement in students’ learning. Students also have an opportunity to explore the contextual complexities that impact numeracy teaching including the relationship between teaching and faith.

The emphasis in this course is on developing effective teaching practices in the English
Learning Area of the New Zealand curriculum. Students will investigate the primary school
Literacy Programme and inquire into assessment as an integral aspect of fostering
improvement in childrens’ learning. Effective strategies for the EAL learner are also
implemented and assessed. Students also have an opportunity to explore the contextual
complexities that impact literacy teaching including the relationship between teaching and
faith.

This course introduces the student to the foundational concepts of teaching competencies and understanding the learner. It introduces the beginning skills of teaching craft including planning and classroom management. Exploring the role of assessment of learners' achievement and evaluation of effective teaching and learning will heighten awareness of factors that influence teacher professionalism, learning and behavior in a classroom. Reflections and evaluation are critical issus for living a responsible life in accordance with God's Word.

This foundational course explores primary education as ako—the flow of teaching and learning, taha wairua—the nurturing of the whole child and whaiwāhitanga—inclusion of all learners.  On this platform, a broad understanding of effective and relational pedagogies is developed and connected to inclusive practices, inclusive environments, and inclusive management strategies.  A personal philosophy of inclusive teaching in the context of bicultural character of New Zealand/Aotearoa education is initiated.

This course surveys contemporary understandings of human development in conversation with Christian theological descriptions of human being. 



This course builds on Mathematics and Statistics I. It is designed to challenge students to critique a range of current pedagogical and social issues in mathematics and statistics education. There is a specific focus on assessment and on the teaching and learning of statistics. Consolidation of personal mathematical growth is expected and biblical perspectives will continue to underpin the course.

The English learning area is structured around the modes of making meaning and creating meaning. This course advances understanding of the relationship between making meaning and creating meaning in Primary English with an emphasis on Speaking, Writing and Presenting. Advanced strategies for EAL language teaching and support are developed.

Well-being is both a personal and social responsibility that requires a deep sense of connection between individuals, communities, environments, the wider society and the Creator.  Students will develop an understanding of the broad principles and key concepts that underpin the notion of Hauora (spiritual, emotional, mental and physical well-being).   Such understanding will then be applied to the learning areas outlined in the New Zealand Curriculum (2007).

The goal of this course is for student teachers to build on the teaching experience they gained during Practicum 2, in order to apply skills of unit planning, teaching a unit and evaluating a unit in a whole class setting. Students will sustain and maintain an effective learning environment across blocks of time increasing full class responsibility for 1-2 days. Students will continue to critically and theologically reflect on teaching and learning.

This course has two significant foci. Firstly, participating in the establishment phase of a classroom, student teachers critically reflect on school and classroom organisation to understand the teacher’s professional role in enabling learning within a complex environment. Secondly, the student teacher develops culturally responsive pedagogies in the context of diverse classrooms and communities. This is achieved by teaching with a goal to raise achievement levels in Māori and Pasifika ākonga. Students will sustain and maintain an effective learning environment with a minimum of 5 days of full class responsibility. Student teachers continue to critically engage with the concept of teaching as vocation.

This course is designed for the graduating teacher to draw on repertoires of knowledge, practices, professional attributes and personal philosophy of teaching to facilitate learning for the classroom in a sustained, full responsibility capacity over a five-week period following an orientation and preparation period.

This course explores the development of Māori and Pasifika education in Aotearoa New Zealand in the framework of a theology of social justice. Recent research is investigated for strategies and practices that lift Māori and Pasifika learner achievement. Ka Hikitia, Tātaiako and the Pasifika Education Plan are engaged. Restorative practice as a positive and culturally responsive intervention is evaluated. The course engages with Graduating Teacher Standard 6: Graduating Teachers develop positive relationships with learners and the members of learning communities.

In this course students will explore the interrelation of social justice, critical pedagogy and primary education in Aotearoa New Zealand. Along with developing a critical theological understanding of social justice, students will also engage with and evaluate the social justice legacy of Christian education and educators in New Zealand and globally. 
This course engages with Graduating Teacher Standard 3: Graduating Teachers understand how contextual factors influence teaching and learning.